Cynthia Ozick | The Din in the Head

Reading through her essays is like living with each subject and learning some of the smallest bits of detail—or something bigger—but feeling like you were there, watching each event, or idea unfold into an extraordinary piece of art. 

 

0618470506 Houghton Mifflin; 243 pgs; $24

Cynthia Ozick’s literary knowledge shines throughout her essay collection in The Din in the Head.  Ozick has a remarkable ability to weave in and out of author and novel, and at the same time, continue to connect tidbits as momentum gains. Reading through chapter after chapter, the pace picks up faster and faster and faster—until you hit the chapter "The Din in the Head." This din in our heads, or humming, as Ozick relates it to, keeps the reader focused on the importance of true, well written literature, and her interpretation of such.

As Ozick is a true critc, she uses her wealth of knowledge, not only about the words or structure, but the writer as well. Throughout her essays Ozick continues to give examples, feelings, ideals, and reasons on what good literature is based on. Reading through her essays is like living with each subject and learning some of the smallest bits of detail—or something bigger—but feeling like you were there, watching each event or idea unfold into an extraordinary piece of art.

As a fan of essays, I enjoyed the winding path this collection of work granted me. It is not for the simplest thinker, nor is it for the occasional reader. It is, however, for the person wanting to expand, or challenge their ideals of the art of literature.  In these essays, Ozick has a way of digging deep into your brain and pulling out the dust balls, examining them, and re-depositing a piece of something better. | Lori Wine

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