The Ettes | Danger Is EP (Take Root)

cd_ettes.jpgA nice diversion from one of the most promising rock bands today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Look At Life Again ended up being one of the best rock releases of 2008, and while Danger Is stands as an above-average EP, it has you wanting more from the arty trio for all the right reasons. Self-described as beat punk, it’s easy to see that their influences range from the ’60s, to early punk to the modern age, and they use them well. The sound is slightly different, but still for fuzz fetishists and retro-enthusiasts alike. Guitarist/singer Coco oozes awesome from her fingers and vocal chords once again.

Some have tried to make a hard connection between The Ettes and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, using their commonalities as unoriginal on the part of the West Coast band, but when you’re treading in this territory, with the sassy vocals, aggressive and direct lyrics from a female point of view backed by raw guitars and driving drums, the concern should be on the quality of the music and not a "who did it first?" pissing contest. The Ettes definitely have a vibe and approach that works. Two of the tracks guest star The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach and, oddly, they lack the riffage you’d expect but still utilize fuzztones with perfection. The live performances of "The Rules" and "I Heard Tell" are fiery, showcasing why The Ettes are one of the few rock bands worth keeping tabs on these days. Fans of The (Int’l.) Noise Conspiracy, The Cramps and The Hives will have no problem digging this.

Ultimately, the only real problem here is the EP format, typically a stopgap between creative spurts or a safe haven for songs that didn’t cut it the first time around. Let’s face it, the EP is the handjob of record releases. It’s often too short, and a good one usually isn’t something you’re going to tell your friends about. However, you should tell your friends about The Ettes. B | Bryan J. Sutter

RIYL: The (Int’l.) Noise Conspiracy, The Cramps, The Hives, The Stooges

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