The Delicious | The Delicious the Delicious (Joyful Noise)

cd_delicious.jpgThere are plenty of bands out there that have Pavement high on their list of influences, but relatively few that can turn said influence into something so original and singular.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Delicious have reissued their first record The Delicious the Delicious on Joyful Noise Recordings. If you didn’t catch it the first time, you are not alone—I would guess that not many outside their Bloomington, Ind., hometown did—but it certainly begs a listen. Like many indie rock bands these days, the Delicious have a major influence in Pavement. They play spazzy pop/rock/acoustic that occasionally slows to a walking tempo to showcase the offbeat, sometimes inscrutable but often simultaneously honest and comical lyrics. However, while there is certainly a Malkmusian tinge to the vocals, whether in conversational slacker mode or unhinged yodel, and no lack of jazz-pop breakdowns in the music, the Delicious are still quite able to carve out their own quirk-filled niche. Now, despite its connotations, I do not use quirky as a put-down. I only underline the originality of this outfit. The band makes good use of tempo and time changes, as well as WTF piss-takes (see "Future Grieving"), that serve to keep the listener guessing and give the band a singular sound, despite their obvious influences.

The album begins with a pleasant piano rag that descends into an electric cacophony within a minute and a half, but after that it’s straight-ahead indie rock. The next track "It’s Not Time to Die" starts the actual record off well with peppy pop guitars, eighth-note handclaps and kitchen-sink percussion that keep the song moving quickly down the road.

The second full track, "Math," has the band in full hoedown mode with a four-on-the-floor bass drum and an acoustic strum that will make you want to spin your partner ’round and ’round, interluded by a brief and slightly dissonant melodica duet.

"Separated at Birth" starts off like a number by recent favorites the Dodos with its driving acoustic guitar and machine-gun drums, setting off the slightly unhinged vocals until they drop off abruptly into a leisurely pace, only to build up again until the kazoo-filled denouement.

The second-to-last track, "The Opportunity," an invitation to dance, showcases the band’s penchant for witty lyrics as the last lines—"If you grant me the opportunity/ I will gyrate rhythmically/ in your vicinity"—are repeated over and over until they transform from an awkward come-on into an irresistible sing-along chant.

There are plenty of bands out there that have Pavement high on their list of influences, but relatively few that can turn said influence into something so original and singular. A- | Kurt Klopmeier

RIYL: Pavement, The Dodos, Born Ruffians

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