Locksley | Don’t Make Me Wait (Feature)

cd_locksleyListening to the songs on Don't Make Me Wait, one might think back to an Ed Sullivan–era Beatles. The band seems to carry that same befuddled charm the Fab Four was known for back in early 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

All of the customary attributes are in place: matching attire, corresponding haircuts, and the obvious throwback sound that makes Mitch Ryder pull his hair out. The truckloads of buzz and hype don't hurt, either. There's no doubt that Locksley is gearing up for a big year. With all the elements set and the planets lining up just right, it will not be easy to ignore this band. The debut album, Don't Make Me Wait, seems to recall a time when bands like the Hives and the Strokes had epic years. As the album title suggest, Locksley has waited long enough.

The song and dance isn't too far from their contemporaries, but it seems that Locksley has something going for them the others never seemed to grasp: charisma. Listening to the songs on Don't Make Me Wait, one might think back to an Ed Sullivan–era Beatles. The band seems to carry that same befuddled charm the Fab Four was known for back in early 1960s. The opening title track is upbeat and gets things heading off the right direction. It's hard not to love the catchy vocals parts. "Don't make me wait so lo-on-on-ong./ To hesitate would be wron-on-on-ong." Cue the screaming girls. The album is host to so many possible singles, it only serves as proof to how marketable this band really is. "Why Can't I Be You? (Why Not Me?)" is another justification of pop sensibility but actually boasts some great lines. "Who needs class when you got money?/ Well I've got cash, but you've got everything else/ Well you can call me crazy, but I heard that sells." Every song is one completely well-placed zinger after another.

There are parts on the album that feel a little too stolen. "The Past and the Present" sounds strikingly like a Beatles song, right down to the way the vocals are delivered. And something doesn't seem right about including some "sha-la-la-la's" on any track, but there they are for your vintage pleasure. This time next year, when Locksley is trying to get away from this image and change their sound, these influences will end up haunting them. Innovation is key for a band's longevity; even the Beatles proved that.

The whole idea of a nostalgic sound can seem to run out of gas awfully fast these days. The Strokes have carried on (but are fading) and the Hives have all but disappeared. And maybe they should. Who are the Von Bondies again? Locksley needs to watch their step and hopefully ride this out while it's fresh, then reinvent-drastically. As for Don't Make Me Wait, it's full of the kind of fantastic hooks and novelty that will get a lot of attention. Ah, but how fast we forget. B+ | Chris Schott

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply