Junior Boys | So This Is Goodbye (Domino)

For Junior Boys, bass is more than a rhythmic tool; it dictates texture, mood, and, as expected, sexuality and reaches beyond the point of pushing air or facilitating movement to a peak of mind-enhancing ecstasy.

 

At the risk of sounding like a total sleazebag, I’d like to share my most apt, and frequently vocalized, comment about Ontario, Canada’s Junior Boys: “Junior Boys make clothes come off.”

If the debut effort, Last Exit, from Jeremy Greenspan along with engineer Matt Didemus (and contributions from sometime-around-then-member Johnny Dark) conveyed any key detail, this is it. In the bedroom, at a coffee shop, in an airplane, or on the Boston duck tour—if someone slips on Junior Boys, you better believe those clothes will be slipping off. It’s sophisti-slutty jams like this that can turn even the gloomiest of stand-there-sad emo kids into soupaman louvers and magically restore the yearn and burn to a eunuch’s nether-regions.

The Boys’ second round of seduction, So This Is Goodbye, picks up properly where the previous release left off (leaving us all aching for more) with an ever-increasing studio savvy that keeps the game fresh and focused. First and foremost, I’m talking about bass (Greenspan’s vocals are merely an added bonus). What these Boys do with bass is unbelievable, and you might not even realize it until you crank the volume on “The Equilizer” or zone out to the hypnotic “Double Shadow.” For Junior Boys, bass is more than a rhythmic tool; it dictates texture, mood, and, as expected, sexuality and reaches beyond the point of pushing air or facilitating movement to a peak of mind-enhancing ecstasy. Songs such as “Count Souvenirs” will make you feel thinner, fitter, and more attractive, all thanks to the adroit manipulation of low tones—a skill many producers gloss over with meathead-ish pounds that serve no more purpose than creating a loud, loud noise.

So This Is Goodbye is the type of album that makes you rip CDs onto iTunes at a higher bitrate. It’s a collection of songs that’ll have you scouring the Internet for speakers with the type of response that can handle such thrilling sounds because it should, and always will, be played at woofer-straining volumes. Whereas Last Exit was a slow, creeping record that took months before the real brunt of the songs hit, So This Is Goodbye is immediate. Previous staples such as “Birthday” and “Teach Me How to Fight” buried themselves deeper, later, perhaps revealing an overarching grater complexity to the record. Initially, So This Is Goodbye, with its instantly gratifying “In the Morning” (featuring Andi Toma of Mouse on Mars) and title track, feels like—well, since we’re on the subject, a cheap slut, in for the quick fix but nowhere to be found when you’re struck with life’s weight. But maybe that’s exactly what’s so awesome about it, this feeling of being used, tossed around, manipulated, and discarded. After all, Greenspan’s already proven his bedroom prowess—onto the dirty stuff.

 

RIYL: doin’ it, Timbaland, subwoofers


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