Get Myself Into It | The Rapture

rapture

The size of it really doesn't matter. What matters is if people come looking for fun or not. You can play big gigs that are horrible and you can play small gigs that are horrible, and vice versa.

 

prof_rapture_sm Every now and then, something will come across my desk/iPod that just fits. It might fit the mood or the weather…whatever the case, it just sort of fits. The music seeps into the background, and surrounds me, just like the chair I sit in, or the weather outside, it exists as part of my environment. When that happens to me, I know it's a special disc.

Now that spring has sprung and green grass has grown, it's time for new music to reflect the bright a sunny weather, something that lifts our spirits. That's where the Rapture comes in. I'm not talking about the Biblical rapture; I'm talking about the New York four-piece whose irresistible dance-pop tunes have exploded in the past year.

Punchy guitars, driving beats, and fun vocals make the Rapture a more accessible and arguably more successful Ratatat. Embracing upbeat, energetic, and often carefree attitudes, their quest to get the party moving, butts-a-shaking, and sweat-a-dropping has turned out an extremely vibrant album that compels the listener to get up and escape day-to-day drudgery, and enjoy themselves.

PLAYBACK:stl caught up with Mattie Safer (bass, vocals) while the band was on tour to support their third release, Pieces of the People We Love.

 

You kicked off your U.S. tour earlier this month. How has it been so far?

It's been a pretty bitchin' tour. It's nice to get around the States again, and get to some cities that we haven't been to in a while.

How have U.S. audiences responded compared to European audiences?

I think there's a little more notoriety in Europe, but as far as shows go, our audiences are still our audiences. It's all people.

Your sound lends itself to amazing live performances. Which do you prefer: small, intimate gigs, or larger festivals?

The size of it really doesn't matter. What matters is if people come looking for fun or not. You can play big gigs that are horrible and you can play small gigs that are horrible, and vice versa.

Ewan Pearson and Paul Epworth produced the new album, Pieces of the People We Love. How did you meet?

They are a couple of old friends. Paul was our sound man in Europe for a year or so back in 2002-2003. Ewan was someone we played a show with.

What did they bring to the table during the recording process?

Good taste, good work ethic, the ability to make things sound good.

And Danger Mouse [worked on "Pieces…" and "Calling Me"]?

He was really friendly, easy-going guy. It was good shit.

Describe your songwriting process.

It's largely a collective effort. Sometimes it works out real easy, and sometimes it doesn't. We just sit in the room and bang it out.

The last line from the single is "Whoo alright…uh huh/ I used to think life's a bitter pill, but it's a grand old time." Is this optimism what you hope to communicate with Pieces?

I don't know if that's what Pieces of the People We Love [is about]. Things certainly did get better for us. Things are better for the band: everyone's in a better spot personally.

You and Jenner share the vocals; splitting your rhythmic, beat-driven raps, with Jenner's more melodic hooks. How do you decide which approach to take when writing?

It just kind of works itself out. It just happens however it happens. There's no real discussion. We've known each other for so long.

 

Glen Elkins is the guitarist and bassist for the St. Louis-based shoegaze quartet Sleepwalker.

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