Cinema St. Louis Presents Filmmaker’s Showcase

cinema.jpgThe Eight Annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase (SLFS), an annual presentation of the nonprofit Cinema St. Louis, serves as the area’s primary venue for films made by local artists. SLFS screens works that were written, directed, edited or produced by St. Louis natives or those with strong local ties.

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, July 19: Filmmaking Seminars 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar Blvd. Topics include Cinematography, Distribution, Legal Issues in Filmmaking, and Producing Independent Features in St. Louis. These seminars are free and open to the public.
Sunday-Thursday, July 20-24: Film Programs
At the Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Blvd.
See full schedule for times and film descriptions (or visit www.cinemastlouis.org).
Thursday, July 24: Closing-Night Awards Party
8 p.m.-midnight at Blueberry Hill’s Elvis Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd.
Free (donations accepted).
The Eight Annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase (SLFS), an annual presentation of the nonprofit Cinema St. Louis, serves as the area’s primary venue for films made by local artists. SLFS screens works that were written, directed, edited or produced by St. Louis natives or those with strong local ties.
The 16 film programs that screen at the Tivoli from July 20-24 serve as SLFS’s centerpiece. The programs range from full-length fiction features and documentaries to multi-film compilations of fiction and documentary shorts. Most programs include post-screening Q&As with filmmakers. There are 70 films participating in this year’s event made by filmmakers of all ages.
In addition to the screenings, SLFS offers filmmaking seminars for anyone interested in the moviemaking process. The programs will explore a wide range of topics and feature Q&As with working filmmakers. The seminars are held from 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, July 19, at the Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar Blvd. Admission is free.
SLFS hosts a closing-night awards party on Thursday, July 24, at Blueberry Hill’s Elvis Room, 6504 Delmar Blvd. KDHX DJ Rob Levy will spin music, and Cinema St. Louis will announce the SLFS films chosen for inclusion in the St. Louis International Film Festival. Awards for the best SLFS films will be given by the St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.
Highlights of this year’s SLFS include the following:
    ◦    Wyatt Weed’s feature debut, Shadowland, a supernatural thriller.
    ◦    Scott Wibbenmeyer’s feature debut, Advertising for the Mob, a wacky mob comedy.
    ◦    Jay Kanzler’s documentary St. Benedict’s Rule, which is the story of a murder in a Benedictine monastery in northern Missouri.
    ◦    Matt Krentz’s feature debut, Streetballers, a drama about urban street-basketball competitions.
    ◦    Academy of Doom, a wildly campy comedy shot in the style of the no-budget psychotronic Mexican lucha films of the 1970’s
    ◦    Sockville, an animated/live-action educational-themed feature for younger audiences produced by Patrick Voss.
    ◦    Free Filmmaking Seminars featuring discussions with local producers, directors, cinematographers, and attorneys.
Tickets
Tickets for film programs at the Tivoli are $10 each; $8 for students with valid and current photo ID and for Cinema St. Louis members with valid membership cards. Advance tickets go on sale beginning Monday, July 1, at the Tivoli Theatre box office (5-10 p.m. Monday-Friday and 2-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday). Tickets are on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets may also be purchased in advance at tickets.landmarktheatres.com. There is a $1 per-ticket service charge. You must pick up your tickets at the Tivoli box-office window. Bring the credit card that you used to purchase the tickets and the confirmation number. Online sales are limited to full-price tickets only. Cinema St. Louis member and student discounts can only be obtained in person at the box office because ID is required. No phone sales.
Fact sheet
Eighth Annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase
Sunday-Wednesday, July 19-24, 2008
July 19: Filmmaking Seminar, Regional Arts Commission
July 20-24: 14 Film Programs, Tivoli Theatre
July 24: Closing-Night Awards Party, Blueberry Hill

The St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase (SLFS), an annual presentation of the nonprofit Cinema St. Louis, serves as the area’s primary venue for films made by local artists.
With advances in affordable digital filmmaking, more and more movies are being made in St. Louis and environs, but opportunities for moviegoers to see that work are scarce, because few of the films ever screen commercially. SLFS frequently provides the only chance area filmmakers have to display their talents on the big screen.
SLFS is held at the Tivoli Theatre (right) in the vibrant Delmar Loop entertainment district. A carefully renovated art-deco theater from the 1920s with a 450-seat main auditorium, the Tivoli is regularly voted St. Louis’ favorite theater in the Riverfront Times’ annual “Best of St. Louis” poll.
    ◦    SLFS screens works that were written, directed, edited, or produced by St. Louis natives or those with strong local ties.
    ◦    SLFS features 15 programs over five days, ranging from full-length fiction features and documentaries to multi-film compilations of fiction and documentary shorts.
    ◦    SLFS includes post-screening Q&As with filmmakers and offers lively seminars on the moviemaking process.
    ◦    SLFS hosts a closing-night party at Blueberry Hill that features announcements of SLFS films chosen for inclusion in the St. Louis International Film Festival and awards given by the St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association.
SLFS History
Cinema St. Louis has presented the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase since 2002, taking over from the now-closed St. Louis Film Office, which inaugurated the event in 2001. During its seven-year existence, SLFS has shown more than 360 films with St. Louis ties.
Last year, SLFS screened 63 films (out of more than 100 submissions) in 13 programs. The event was held at the Tivoli Theatre and drew more than 2,500 attendees. Artists included students, film hobbyists, and seasoned professionals.
Among the highlights of past years:
    ◦    Interstate 60, the first feature directed by native St. Louisan Bob Gale, co-writer and producer of the Back to the Future trilogy (right).
    ◦    Chris Grega’s Rhineland, an ambitious World War II combat drama that was shot in rural wooded areas near St. Louis.
    ◦    The gorgeously shot psychological thriller Ghost Image, starring Law & Order’s Elisabeth Rohm and directed by Jack Snyder.
    ◦    The director’s cut of the Edie Sedgwick/Andy Warhol biopic Factory Girl, with director George Hickenlooper, a St. Louis native, in attendance.
    ◦    “Researching Raymond Burke,” a short starring John Heard by Webster U. grad Brian Jun, whose feature Steel City played in competition at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival.
    ◦    Native St. Louisan and longtime Hollywood screenwriter Brian Hohlfeld’s locally shot feature Abdul Loves Cleopatra.
    ◦    Documentaries on two late, lamented St. Louis institutions: Bill Boll’s celebration of the Coral Court Motel, Built for Speed, and Bruce Marren’s two-film exploration of Gaslight Square, The Forgotten Landmark and The Legend Lives On.
    ◦    Bob Miano and Scott Huegerich’s enormously popular examination of the 1904 World’s Fair, The World’s Greatest Fair (left).

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