What’s the Story Corey and Corey?

Since its release in 1987, The Lost Boys has remained popular. The film not only helped make Kiefer Sutherland and Jason Patric box office stars, but also featured the most successful onscreen pairing of two of the decade’s most recognizable teen actors, Corey Haim and Corey Feldman.

Haim, a Canadian born actor who scored huge box office success in the ’80s with The Lost Boys and Lucas, has been away for a while but is poised to make a comeback. In fact, The Thrills recently penned “Whatever Happened to Corey Haim?” in his honor.

Feldman is a wildman. He was arguably the most prolific child actor of the ’80s, starring in Dweebs, Goonies, Stand By Me, and The Lost Boys. Although he used to run with Michael Jackson and recorded a hip-hop record, he loves his rock ’n’ roll. Although he stills acts a great deal, this son of a songwriter primarily focuses his attention on his music.
Playback St. Louis was fortunate enough to catch up with Haim and Feldman in San Diego as they took a break from promoting the new Lost Boys DVD at Comic Con. These two stalwarts of ’80s teen culture were laid back, relaxed, and in stride as they discussed their film careers and their lives away from the spotlight.

What have you been working on lately?
Corey Haim: Nothing. I’ve been out in Toronto for five or six years now. I had to go home; there were some health issues.

How did you get involved in The Lost Boys reissue?
CH: Everyone flew in from Lost Boys [to work on the DVD]. This is like literally 16 years later and I got to do my first special-edition DVD. I had a great time.

Do you like the DVD process?
CH: It’s a whole process that’s like making the movie after the movie. I have a double standard. I think it makes it more complicated, but I think it’s absolutely well worth it.

Do you have any other DVD projects in the works?
CH: Not at the moment. License to Drive we’re hoping next year will be kicking.

Corey [Feldman], do you want to tell us what you’ve been up to lately?
Corey Feldman: I knocked up a woman; I’m pretty proud of that. [Laughs] Got a kid on the way, a chip off the old block. She’ll be spitting him out in about a month.
CH: I’m the godfather!
CF: I heard about this great opportunity to do this Lost Boys thing and I was like, “They remember me!” No, I am doing a new Disney TV series, Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go—that really is the title. It’s gonna be the biggest friggin’ cartoon in the history of cartoons. It’s like Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Transformers, Ninja Turtles, all those things thrown together into one big teriyaki soufflé. The cartoon will premiere on ABC Family and Toon Disney and the Playboy Channel, all simultaneously. I’m working on my fourth album, really good stuff; I’m working with The Wizards, who are brilliant producers. That’s my solo stuff. My band, The Truth Movement, is starting to write the next record. I just finished a movie in Barcelona. I was there for three months working on this movie called The Birthday.
CH: We tried to get him into the Olympics but he just didn’t have it.
CF: I’m training for the shot put. [Laughs] The Birthday is an epic film. Actually, it is one of my favorite films that I’ve done in my career. It’s a movie that’s all in real time. They shoot the lead character, which is me, in every single shot of the film. So, basically you go with this character on this journey for like an hour and a half and it’s insane. It’s a black romantic-comedy-slash-psychological-thriller. It’s like if David Lynch and Steven Spielberg had a baby; that’s who this director would be.

When did you guys meet and become friends?
CF: We met 17 years ago and we’re still not friends, but we’re working on it. We just happen to run into each other all the time. Sometimes he just happens to be sleeping at my house.
CH: It’s all about credit. I’ve got plenty; he’s got none.

Was it hard being famous in the ’80s as opposed to being famous now?
CF: I prefer to be famous now. If I could have not been famous in the ’80s, I’d be happy.

You alluded to getting License to Drive out on DVD. Is that something you’re really working hard for?
CH: We’re hoping to. We still have all the connections.
CF: I’ve been panhandling out on 20th. [Laughs]
CH: Once we both panhandled out on 20th. Honestly, it’s a great movie. It was Heather Graham’s first movie. [Corey and I] had great chemistry together; we always have. That’s why we’ve done seven movies together.

Why does Lost Boys remain popular?
CF: I think Lost Boys is one of those timeless movies that will live on forever because it’s a great movie. It’s funny, it’s scary, and it’s got all the elements that make a good movie.
CH: I think it’ll go on. We’ll have a 30th-year, maybe 40th-year, edition.
CF: What’s not to like? It’s got Corey Ian Haim starring in it. [Claps]

Despite their reputation for sleeping all day and partying all night, Corey Feldman and Corey Haim remain very close friends. It makes sense; they have each gone through the wars of fame and emerged intact. Despite all the rough ways and rowdy pasts, the duo is older and wiser now, focused on their lives and careers. Fortunately, their reckless youth lives in infamy through the endearing re-release of The Lost Boys.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

What’s the Story Corey and Corey?

Since its release in 1987, The Lost Boys has remained popular. The film not only helped make Kiefer Sutherland and Jason Patric box office stars, but also featured the most successful onscreen pairing of two of the decade’s most recognizable teen actors, Corey Haim and Corey Feldman.

Haim, a Canadian born actor who scored huge box office success in the ’80s with The Lost Boys and Lucas, has been away for a while but is poised to make a comeback. In fact, The Thrills recently penned “Whatever Happened to Corey Haim?” in his honor.

Feldman is a wildman. He was arguably the most prolific child actor of the ’80s, starring in Dweebs, Goonies, Stand By Me, and The Lost Boys. Although he used to run with Michael Jackson and recorded a hip-hop record, he loves his rock ’n’ roll. Although he stills acts a great deal, this son of a songwriter primarily focuses his attention on his music.
Playback St. Louis was fortunate enough to catch up with Haim and Feldman in San Diego as they took a break from promoting the new Lost Boys DVD at Comic Con. These two stalwarts of ’80s teen culture were laid back, relaxed, and in stride as they discussed their film careers and their lives away from the spotlight.

What have you been working on lately?
Corey Haim: Nothing. I’ve been out in Toronto for five or six years now. I had to go home; there were some health issues.

How did you get involved in The Lost Boys reissue?
CH: Everyone flew in from Lost Boys [to work on the DVD]. This is like literally 16 years later and I got to do my first special-edition DVD. I had a great time.

Do you like the DVD process?
CH: It’s a whole process that’s like making the movie after the movie. I have a double standard. I think it makes it more complicated, but I think it’s absolutely well worth it.

Do you have any other DVD projects in the works?
CH: Not at the moment. License to Drive we’re hoping next year will be kicking.

Corey [Feldman], do you want to tell us what you’ve been up to lately?
Corey Feldman: I knocked up a woman; I’m pretty proud of that. [Laughs] Got a kid on the way, a chip off the old block. She’ll be spitting him out in about a month.
CH: I’m the godfather!
CF: I heard about this great opportunity to do this Lost Boys thing and I was like, “They remember me!” No, I am doing a new Disney TV series, Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go—that really is the title. It’s gonna be the biggest friggin’ cartoon in the history of cartoons. It’s like Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Transformers, Ninja Turtles, all those things thrown together into one big teriyaki soufflé. The cartoon will premiere on ABC Family and Toon Disney and the Playboy Channel, all simultaneously. I’m working on my fourth album, really good stuff; I’m working with The Wizards, who are brilliant producers. That’s my solo stuff. My band, The Truth Movement, is starting to write the next record. I just finished a movie in Barcelona. I was there for three months working on this movie called The Birthday.
CH: We tried to get him into the Olympics but he just didn’t have it.
CF: I’m training for the shot put. [Laughs] The Birthday is an epic film. Actually, it is one of my favorite films that I’ve done in my career. It’s a movie that’s all in real time. They shoot the lead character, which is me, in every single shot of the film. So, basically you go with this character on this journey for like an hour and a half and it’s insane. It’s a black romantic-comedy-slash-psychological-thriller. It’s like if David Lynch and Steven Spielberg had a baby; that’s who this director would be.

When did you guys meet and become friends?
CF: We met 17 years ago and we’re still not friends, but we’re working on it. We just happen to run into each other all the time. Sometimes he just happens to be sleeping at my house.
CH: It’s all about credit. I’ve got plenty; he’s got none.

Was it hard being famous in the ’80s as opposed to being famous now?
CF: I prefer to be famous now. If I could have not been famous in the ’80s, I’d be happy.

You alluded to getting License to Drive out on DVD. Is that something you’re really working hard for?
CH: We’re hoping to. We still have all the connections.
CF: I’ve been panhandling out on 20th. [Laughs]
CH: Once we both panhandled out on 20th. Honestly, it’s a great movie. It was Heather Graham’s first movie. [Corey and I] had great chemistry together; we always have. That’s why we’ve done seven movies together.

Why does Lost Boys remain popular?
CF: I think Lost Boys is one of those timeless movies that will live on forever because it’s a great movie. It’s funny, it’s scary, and it’s got all the elements that make a good movie.
CH: I think it’ll go on. We’ll have a 30th-year, maybe 40th-year, edition.
CF: What’s not to like? It’s got Corey Ian Haim starring in it. [Claps]

Despite their reputation for sleeping all day and partying all night, Corey Feldman and Corey Haim remain very close friends. It makes sense; they have each gone through the wars of fame and emerged intact. Despite all the rough ways and rowdy pasts, the duo is older and wiser now, focused on their lives and careers. Fortunately, their reckless youth lives in infamy through the endearing re-release of The Lost Boys.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

What’s the Story Corey and Corey?

Since its release in 1987, The Lost Boys has remained popular. The film not only helped make Kiefer Sutherland and Jason Patric box office stars, but also featured the most successful onscreen pairing of two of the decade’s most recognizable teen actors, Corey Haim and Corey Feldman.

Haim, a Canadian born actor who scored huge box office success in the ’80s with The Lost Boys and Lucas, has been away for a while but is poised to make a comeback. In fact, The Thrills recently penned “Whatever Happened to Corey Haim?” in his honor.

Feldman is a wildman. He was arguably the most prolific child actor of the ’80s, starring in Dweebs, Goonies, Stand By Me, and The Lost Boys. Although he used to run with Michael Jackson and recorded a hip-hop record, he loves his rock ’n’ roll. Although he stills acts a great deal, this son of a songwriter primarily focuses his attention on his music.
Playback St. Louis was fortunate enough to catch up with Haim and Feldman in San Diego as they took a break from promoting the new Lost Boys DVD at Comic Con. These two stalwarts of ’80s teen culture were laid back, relaxed, and in stride as they discussed their film careers and their lives away from the spotlight.

What have you been working on lately?
Corey Haim: Nothing. I’ve been out in Toronto for five or six years now. I had to go home; there were some health issues.

How did you get involved in The Lost Boys reissue?
CH: Everyone flew in from Lost Boys [to work on the DVD]. This is like literally 16 years later and I got to do my first special-edition DVD. I had a great time.

Do you like the DVD process?
CH: It’s a whole process that’s like making the movie after the movie. I have a double standard. I think it makes it more complicated, but I think it’s absolutely well worth it.

Do you have any other DVD projects in the works?
CH: Not at the moment. License to Drive we’re hoping next year will be kicking.

Corey [Feldman], do you want to tell us what you’ve been up to lately?
Corey Feldman: I knocked up a woman; I’m pretty proud of that. [Laughs] Got a kid on the way, a chip off the old block. She’ll be spitting him out in about a month.
CH: I’m the godfather!
CF: I heard about this great opportunity to do this Lost Boys thing and I was like, “They remember me!” No, I am doing a new Disney TV series, Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go—that really is the title. It’s gonna be the biggest friggin’ cartoon in the history of cartoons. It’s like Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Transformers, Ninja Turtles, all those things thrown together into one big teriyaki soufflé. The cartoon will premiere on ABC Family and Toon Disney and the Playboy Channel, all simultaneously. I’m working on my fourth album, really good stuff; I’m working with The Wizards, who are brilliant producers. That’s my solo stuff. My band, The Truth Movement, is starting to write the next record. I just finished a movie in Barcelona. I was there for three months working on this movie called The Birthday.
CH: We tried to get him into the Olympics but he just didn’t have it.
CF: I’m training for the shot put. [Laughs] The Birthday is an epic film. Actually, it is one of my favorite films that I’ve done in my career. It’s a movie that’s all in real time. They shoot the lead character, which is me, in every single shot of the film. So, basically you go with this character on this journey for like an hour and a half and it’s insane. It’s a black romantic-comedy-slash-psychological-thriller. It’s like if David Lynch and Steven Spielberg had a baby; that’s who this director would be.

When did you guys meet and become friends?
CF: We met 17 years ago and we’re still not friends, but we’re working on it. We just happen to run into each other all the time. Sometimes he just happens to be sleeping at my house.
CH: It’s all about credit. I’ve got plenty; he’s got none.

Was it hard being famous in the ’80s as opposed to being famous now?
CF: I prefer to be famous now. If I could have not been famous in the ’80s, I’d be happy.

You alluded to getting License to Drive out on DVD. Is that something you’re really working hard for?
CH: We’re hoping to. We still have all the connections.
CF: I’ve been panhandling out on 20th. [Laughs]
CH: Once we both panhandled out on 20th. Honestly, it’s a great movie. It was Heather Graham’s first movie. [Corey and I] had great chemistry together; we always have. That’s why we’ve done seven movies together.

Why does Lost Boys remain popular?
CF: I think Lost Boys is one of those timeless movies that will live on forever because it’s a great movie. It’s funny, it’s scary, and it’s got all the elements that make a good movie.
CH: I think it’ll go on. We’ll have a 30th-year, maybe 40th-year, edition.
CF: What’s not to like? It’s got Corey Ian Haim starring in it. [Claps]

Despite their reputation for sleeping all day and partying all night, Corey Feldman and Corey Haim remain very close friends. It makes sense; they have each gone through the wars of fame and emerged intact. Despite all the rough ways and rowdy pasts, the duo is older and wiser now, focused on their lives and careers. Fortunately, their reckless youth lives in infamy through the endearing re-release of The Lost Boys.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply