The Kills | 05.09.08

thekills.jpgWhile their performance, stage antics and great music gave fans a lot to reflect on; the Kills certainly didn’t force it verbally, only intermitting "thank yous" every five songs or so. 

 

 

 

 

The Metro, Chicago

Both MIA and The Kills left their mark on Chicago with incredible performances, as you might expect; however, unfortunately not on the same bill. Between photographing MIA at the Aragon and trying to soak up her 40-minute delayed set and Red-Line-ing it over to the Metro for the Kills’ 17 song set, it was a hectic-yet-thrilling Friday night.

"Sour Cherry" was one of a slew of tunes performed from their March 2008 release, Midnight Boom; including the gem "Tape Song" which followed. The second album title-track "No Wow" came next, marked with the pre-recorded and clearly manufactured (though anything but generic or in poor taste) drumbeats that accompanied all songs performed by VV and Hotel (minus the acoustic "Goodnight Bad Morning.") 

While their performance, stage antics and great music gave fans a lot to reflect on; the Kills certainly didn’t force it verbally, only intermitting "thank yous" every five songs or so. In an interview with Chicago’s Innerview, the Kills discussed their popularity and their response to the "accessibility" tag their critically acclaimed new disc carries.  To me, the accessibility label is appropriate because the album is just plain good and somewhat of a departure from their earlier stuff. But simultaneously inaccurate to longtime fans; Midnight Boom‘s brilliance wasn’t as quickly detectable as highlights from No Wow, and no song is as catchy is as "Cat’s Claw."  Although it is years too soon to confirm this, Midnight Boom will stand the test of time much more so than their two prior efforts.

Album perceptions and popularity played no part however in the purity of their rock character and sound, which were beautifully illustrated on both "Last Day of Magic" and "What New York Used To Be." The harmonious, acoustic highlight "Goodnight, Bad Morning" came as a shock considering it was a successor to the most distortion-filled ear-blistering song of the set. 

The three-song encore completed a wonderful evening, ending with a legendary rock moment when VV and Hotel (lovers, not siblings) hugged each other, forming a trinity with the triumphantly raised guitar. | Joseph O’Fallon

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