LucaBrasi | 11.23.07

live_luca_sm.jpgOn some of the tracks, particularly the slower ones, the guitar work was shrouded and restrained; at times like these, the band truly excelled, its power visible but in check, just under the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

w/The Feed & Ready the Cannons
Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room

live_luca.jpgDressed only in black with flashes of white, the members of LucaBrasi took to the stage of the Duck Room and delivered their new CD in chronological order to the packed house. Early set house lights kept with the monochromatic color scheme, as bright white lights blinded the audience while silhouetting the band. Save one slower number, the music was hard rocking and tightly delivered…and oh, so well received.

This was a unique local show, and not just in the packed house. The crowd arrived early tonight, catching openers Ready the Cannons and The Feed (more on them later) and sticking around ’til the very end. Sure, it helps that two of the members of LucaBrasi were formerly in The Urge, and that each of the four—Mike Jost (drums), Jerry Jost (guitar), Matt McInerney (vocals), Josiah Werner (bass)—has been active in bands both local and national for years. This makes LucaBrasi a supergroup, of sorts, which makes the band’s self-titled debut CD much more polished than most first bows.

Alone with his microphone, McInerney sometimes wailed to the crowd, other times held his pockets and rocked, rising up to meet the microphone. For his part, Jerry had complete control of his axe at all times, serving up riffs and rock lines all night.

Much to the crowd’s delight, special guest John Pessoni (ex-Urge drummer) joined on second guitar and backing vocals toward the end, lending his talents on a timeless-sounding number. At times, LucaBrasi even recalled Stir, yet another St. Louis band with a national footprint.

On some of the tracks, particularly the slower ones, the guitar work was shrouded and restrained; at times like these, the band truly excelled, its power visible but in check, just under the surface. Other times, frontman McInerney threw his head back, a profile in silhouette as he emitted a primal scream: power unleashed. After a two-song encore, the band did what it promised: hang out and drink with its fans.

While opener Ready the Cannon was unpolished yet promising, middle band The Feed proved why it’s regarded as one of the best in St. Louis. Despite problems with the kick drum creeping—one that took far too long to remedy, with the soundman not leaving his perch until over halfway through the set to finally haul out a cement block—the band delivered an upbeat show headed by Dave Grelle’s remarkable Fender Rhodes electric piano playing, expressive face and tongue-in-cheek vocals. In his aviators, black leather bass strap and shitkicking black leather boots, bassist/saxophonist Ben Reece was extra untouchable tonight, and the talented Kevin Bowers was all that behind the kit, despite the problem. The only drawback, alas, was The Feed’s set being cut short by one song—yep, you guessed it, everybody’s favorite: "Good Last Night"—because of a soundman’s schedule inflexibility. Shame. | Laura Hamlett

LucaBrasi photos from PLAY:stl Festival by David Lichius

About Laura Hamlett 467 Articles
Laura Hamlett is the Managing Editor of PLAYBACK:stl. In a past life, she was also a music publicist and band manager. Besides music, books, and other forms of popular culture, she's a fan of the psychology behind true crime and violent criminals. Ask her about mass murder...if you dare.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply