Bullet For My Valentine | 05.21.10

The Delmar Loop was awash with angry youths in black t-shirts on Friday night as a four-band bill of metal descended upon The Pageant.

Arcanium, Airbourne, Chiodos, Bullet For My Valentine

The Pageant 5.21.10

The Delmar Loop was awash with angry youths in black t-shirts on Friday night as a four-band bill of metal descended upon The Pageant. Opening the sold-out show was Loveland, Colorado quintet Arcanium. Only in the metal universe can you score a gig on a prominent tour and be taken seriously despite having members in your band called Sinn, Mystress, Messiah and Razor. Even a diehard metal fan like myself has to wonder if they want to be a band or an American Gladiators team, and their forgettable brand of goth-tinged post-hardcore did little to make their case. Still, they were loud and whipped their hair around and stood on the stage monitors so the crowd responded appropriately.

Airbourne was another story entirely. Backed by a wall of six Marshall stacks, the Aussie band literally ran on stage and did not stop moving for their entire 40 minute set. Shirtless frontman Joel O-Keeffe launched himself into the air off the drum kit, played a blazing guitar solo while fighting his way through the frenzied crowd and swigged beer on stage without missing a beat. The entire band must have burned off 50,000 calories while pumping out a snarling mix of rock in the fine traditions AC/DC and Motorhead.

Metalcore stalwarts Chiodos had the unenviable task of following the dynamic Airbourne, but their angular metalcore attack served them well. It’s hard for bands in this nebulous genre to stand out among groups like Converge, Dillinger Escape Plan and other heavyweights and Chiodos seems to suffer this as well. Sure, they are talented players and know how to work the crowd but their delivery seemed formulaic with a tinge of pandering. Nonetheless, the crowd lapped it up.

Greeted by chants of “Bullet! Bullet!,” the headliners took the stage in front of a packed house. Armed with a wall of 24 (yes twenty-four) guitar amplifiers and a massive double bass drum kit, the band unleashed their twin-guitar attack like a Welsh armada. Matthew Tuck admitted to being under the weather, but still gave a dynamic performance albeit without the stage-trotting hysterics of the opening acts. He hardly needed it—BFMV has always walked a fine line between edgy metal cred and actually writing good songs, and this show was proof of their mastery. | Corey Woodruff
 

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